How To Grow Scallions Indoors
Growing Scallions Indoors

Growing Scallions Indoors

If you’re an avid cook, then you probably know the benefits of incorporating the pungent stalks of scallions into your food. And if you’re not, then you’ll be surprised by the burst of flavor and versatility the green onions can add to your dish. To make things better for the gardener in all of us, it’s very easy to learn to grow scallions indoors.

In addition to taking the taste of your dish to a whole new dimension, scallions are rich in B-complex vitamins as well as minerals such as iron, copper, magnesium, and calcium. Simply put, they are great for your health.

Let’s jump right in, and discover how easy it can be to grow your very own batch of scallions!


Planting Your Scallions

When first starting to grow scallions there are two main ways to do so, in addition to a third way of simply starting with a seedling from a nursery.

The first is simply using seeds. To start with seeds, place them about 1/2″ deep and cover with soil. You can clump them up to start, but once they start to sprout move thin them out until there is about 4-6″ between each plant. Scallions are fairly slow to germinate, so it can take upwards a month to sprout. During this period it’s important to keep the soil moist. If the soil dries out too much then it can increase the time this process takes.

The other option, and one that is significantly quicker, is to start with leftover scraps. Simply save the bottom 3-4″ of a store bought scallion and re-use it! There are two options, either plant it much like a seed roughly 1/2″ deep, or leave it in a small glass of water in bright sun. Either method will work, although gardeners will typically have their preference and will swear by one or the other. In both cases, it takes 1-2 weeks to produce a full grown plant. This process can easily be repeated to always have fresh scallions and green onions ready to use!

Important to note that the rest of this guide will focus on the soil growing variety. The only other important thing to keep in mind for the variety grown in a cup of water is sunlight needs.


Soil & Container

Like other onions, scallions have a fairly shallow root system and therefore require fairly moist content. That said, you don’t want the soil soaking in water. Your best bet is to choose a nutrient rich, well draining potting soil. Then, add a few inches of small rocks or pebbles to the bottom of the container to promote good drainage.

Generally, using clay pots is going to be perfectly fine. These not only help to prevent over-watering, but are also very cheap and easy to obtain. A wide variety of other containers will also work fine. Scallions and green onions are quite hardy and will do well in a variety of containers if taken care of.


Sunlight

Scallions are quite interesting in that they can grow in both full and low light conditions. For best results, place them in a bright, sunny spot that receives 6-8 hours of sunlight per day. If that’s not possible however, scallions will be perfectly happy to grow in lower light conditions. This will not affect the quality of the plant, but will slow down its growth. Bright light will yield harvestable plants in the shortest time, while a more shady location will still produce harvestable plant just in a longer timeframe. This makes it super easy to grow scallions indoors as they are one of the few veggies that can grow in lower light.


Watering

As germination is highly dependent on the moisture content in the soil, it’s best to evenly water your seedlings without drenching or clogging them. You’ll typically want to keep the soil moist, so checking every few days for dryness and water when it starts to feel dry to the touch. Once the seeds sprout, you can ease off watering a bit. This also applies to scraps that have been placed in soil, they will need similar water amounts as of a sprouted plant.


Harvesting your Scallions

Once the plant reaches roughly 6″ tall it is ready to harvest. In this respect, you have two options. You can either pluck the entire plant, all of which is edible. This will however stop the plant from regrowing as the entire plant is used.

You can also simply clip off the top couple inches of the plant, and leave the white bottom and root intact. The scallion will continue to grow after this, and can be re-harvested every couple of weeks. This is the best option for those looking for a continuous supply of the plant.


Grow Scallions Indoors

For those looking for an easy and delicious veggie to grow, learning how to grow scallions indoors is a great option. Scallions are one of the easiest veggies to care for, and one of the few that can produce edible plants in low light conditions. Being able to start from store bought stalks is also a nice bonus, and means no one has any excuse not to grow this delicious plant!

 

High Quality Scallion Seeds on Amazon.com


FAQ

What is The Best Way To Grow Scallions Indoors?

The best way to grow scallions indoors is to start with scraps from another plant. Planting the white ends in soil, or placing it in a small glass of water, speeds up the process of which an edible plant can be obtained.

How Much Light Do Scallions Need?

For best results, place the plant in a spot that gets at least 6 hours of bright sunlight. That said, scallions can grow in lower light conditions of only a few hours. In these cases though, it will take longer for the plant to grow, although it will still be edible.

There are Holes In My Green Onions, Help!?!?

A big problem with green onions is slugs like to chew holes in them. This usually happens when plants are left out on a balcony or porch during warm, wet weather. To stop this simply move the plants indoors during damp days, or take steps to remove the slugs from nearby the plants.

 

 

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